Because I am a girl… I deserve an education!

This is what Michelle Obama has to say about this program:

“Right now, 62 million girls across the globe are not in school. These girls are our future doctors, teachers, and entrepreneurs – they are the dreamers and visionaries who could change the world as we know it if they just had the chance to get the education they need.

This issue is personal for me, because I see myself in these girls. I see my daughters in these girls. And I refuse to just sit back and accept the barriers that keep them from realizing their boundless promise.

That is why I am thrilled to announce that we’re expanding our efforts to “Let Girls Learn” with a new, community-focused girls’ education initiative across the globe. Through this new effort, we’ll be collaborating with the Peace Corps to support hundreds of new community projects – from building school libraries to creating girls’ technology camps – to help girls go to school and stay in school.”

via Because I Am A Girl on Vimeo.

Turkish men in skirts protest violence against women

Many women are attacked, harmed or killed in Turkey. A 17-year-old and a 20-yer-old were recently raped and killed. Some brave men wanted to show support and demand protection for their sisters, daughters, mothers and friends. They wore skirts in a big march in Istambul to show there should be no difference in the way women and men are treated in their country. They want Turkey to be a safer place for the women in their lives.

▶ Men In Skirts Protest Violence Against Women In Turkey – YouTube.

Is the Oscars Academy a male chauvinist institution?

▶ Hey Academy, I’m a Woman. – YouTube.

The Oscars Academy is 93% white and 76% male… In the Directing, Writing and Cinematography sections, nominees were 26 men to… 0 women! Isn’t it time they included some diversity?

Three actresses got fed up with the Academy for excluding women and wrote a song about it. Go girls!

Stop using the R-word!

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Here is what famous athlete Kasey Studdard has to say about being in Special Education for Learning Disabilities as a child:

“I was teased, ridiculed, and isolated.”

“It wasn’t for a lack of intelligence, but I simply couldn’t comprehend things in the same ways the other kids did.”

“Though I often nodded my head to signal that I understood, I did not.”

“Kids can be very mean…” ““Ha-ha, you’re in the RETARD class now!,” they mocked. “Kasey’s so stupid, they had to kick him out of our class,” they teased.”

“In my early teens, to my surprise, I found that I could do things on the court and on the field that other kids could not. Sports became my salvation.”

“Unfortunately, I couldn’t live solely on sports fields. That meant years and years of remedial coursework, time spent before and after school, and countless late nights just to keep up. My mother always made sure the work got done — and for that I will be eternally grateful.”

“it wasn’t the hard work that impacted me most growing up. It was the other students, my special education classmates — the ones with severe mental and physical disabilities who had it far worse than I did — who taught me more about life than any lesson plan ever could. For them, the struggle wasn’t just about self-esteem or fitting in or being “normal,” it was about survival itself.”

“That’s why I have always stood up for the less-fortunate.”

“Whenever I saw a disabled or disadvantaged child at one of our training camps, I would always take time to greet them with a smile and a hug, and to ask how they were doing .”

“I was one of the lucky ones — with sports providing salvation just in time — but everyone deserves an opportunity to shine.”

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Here is a video showing how the R-word (“retarded”) can be as offensive as any other insult against minorities.

https://youtube.com/R-word

You can take the pledge to stop using this mean word!

http://www.r-word.org/

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Fashion photographer takes photos of kids with disabilities

NYC-based photographer Rick Guidotti was in Cincinnati photographing local families of kids living with genetic, physical, and behavioral differences. His non-profit, Positive Exposure, aims to show the “beauty in human diversity.” Film produced by Carrie Cochran, September 2014. Exhibition in Cincinnati, October 2014.

NYC-based photographer Rick Guidotti was in Cincinnati photographing local families of kids living with genetic, physical, and behavioral differences. His non-profit, Positive Exposure, aims to show the "beauty in human diversity." Produced by Carrie Cochran. September 2014

via Former fashion photographer trades supermodels for kids with disabilities on Vimeo.

Boys speaking up for their sisters with Down Syndrome

When their house got spray-painted with hate grafiti, this family reacted to make people understand that their handicapped girls are NOT “retards”, an ugly word that we must stop to use…
If their story moved you, please click this link to go and pledge not to use that word yourself.
http://www.r-word.org

The Hollis Boys, 6 and 7, “Speaking up for our sisters” with Down Syndrome – YouTube.