Women are to be respected

Today is International Women’s Day.

Every day, women are harassed in the street simply for being women. In other words: Every time we step out the house, we run the risk of being shouted at, catcalled, or assaulted.

Brooklyn (New York) artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh is using street art to take a place where women feel uncomfortable and turn it into a place where we cannot be ignored.
women-not for entertainment

women-outfit not invitation
These two posters have a clear message. The first one means that if a woman is wearing a short skirt or a sexy dress, it does not allow men to treat her differently. Her clothes are NOT an invitation to strangers to approach her or make comments!
The second one means that a woman who walks in the street is just a PERSON who walks in the street, she is not there for strange men to look at her or talk to her.

International Women’s Day March 8th

International Women Day
Here is a message from the UN (United Nations) about International Women Day:

“International Women’s Day is a time to reflect on progress made, to call for change and to celebrate acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in the history of their countries and communities.

This year’s theme, “Equality for women is progress for all” emphasizes how gender equality, empowerment of women, women’s full enjoyment of human rights and the eradication of poverty are essential to economic and social development. It also stresses the vital role of women as agents of development.”

international-womens-day

Native Americans want a mascot to be changed

There is an American football team which call themselves the “Redskins”. Many people think this is an offensive name for American Indians and they want this team to change their name. This ad was made to ask for a change to be made, but the NFL (American National Football League) refused to show it during the Superbowl.

Proud To Be – YouTube.

Teenager handcuffed by police because he is Black.

Black teen handcuffed

[difficult words translated at the bottom of the text]

Trayon Christian, a Black teenager, went to a New York shop on Madison Avenue (Barney’s) to buy an expensive $350 belt. He had saved money from his part-time job for weeks to be able to afford it.

After buying the belt and leaving the store, the college student was grabbed by undercover officers and asked, “how a young black man such as himself could afford to purchase such an expensive belt,” and they handcuffed him.

The store clerk had called police, once Trayon Christian exited, claiming that the purchase must have been fraudulent.

The police officers allegedly asked Christian for his ID, telling the teenager that he could “not afford to make such expensive purchases”. After verifying that the card did in fact belong to Christian, they let him go.

Christian, who has no arrest record, said he would never shop at Barneys again and subsequently returned the belt out of disgust.

His lawyer told the New York Post that Christian was unlawfully targeted because of his skin color: “His only crime was being a young black man,” said.

a belt :

belt

 

 

 

handcuffs :

handcuffs

 

 

 

ID :

ID

 

 

 

to purchase = to buy

Malala Yousafzai awarded European prize for freedom of thought

(A video from The Guardian is after the article – click on the link to view it)malala-europe

16 years old Pakistani schoolgirl and campaigner Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban a year ago after campaigning for better rights for girls in Pakistan, has received the EU’s Sakharov human rights prize at a ceremony in Strasbourg.

The 50,000 euro ($65,000) prize is considered Europe’s top human rights award.

“I am hopeful the European Parliament will look beyond Europe to the suffering countries where people are still deprived of their basic rights, their freedom of thought is suppressed, freedom of speech is enchained,” Ms Yousafzai said.

“Many children have no food to eat, no water to drink and children are starving for education. It is alarming that 57 million children are deprived of education… this must shake our conscience.”

She began her speech with a famous quote from 18th Century French philosopher Voltaire: “I do not agree with what you have to say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”

She said children in countries such as Pakistan “do not want an iPhone, a PlayStation or chocolates, they just want a book and a pen”.

MEPs (Members of the European Parliament) gave her a standing ovation.

You can see her and listen to parts of her speech here :

Malala Yousafzai awarded Sakharov prize for freedom of thought – video | World news | theguardian.com.