Generous man cleans homeless persons’ clothes for a week

A laundromat owner spent every night for a week washing 1,000 pounds of homeless people’s laundry.

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As a former social worker, Samuel Van De Cruze already knew about many of the challenges the homeless face. He also realized his new business could offer immediate help.

As an Easter gift to the community, he decided to pick up the laundry from the shelter near his building, each evening that week, and wash, dry, and fold it overnight, returning it by seven o’clock each of the following mornings.

Van De Cruz figures he saved the families money, and gave them clean clothes—and the free time to help them find a job, go to classes, or look for a permanent home.

Free food for homeless people at Indian restaurant

Minu Pauline is the owner of ’’Pappadavada’, a famous restaurant in Kochi in India. One day, she saw a homeless woman eating leftover food from a trashcan. Pauline couldn’t help but feel moved by the site of this woman’s plight, and realized that she had to do something.

So she decided to put a fridge full of food right on the street for those who need it. The fridge is open 24/7, and anyone can take a free meal from it. Pauline adds 78-80 new meals there every day. Other local restaurants and people who care about the homeless also regularly fill the fridge up with food.

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Some American cities abolish Columbus Day

indigenous day instead of columbusFollowing a growing trend, the city council of Albuquerque, New Mexico has voted six to three to recognize October 12th – typically known to most as “Columbus Day” within the USA– as Indigenous Peoples’ day in a new proclamation. Albuquerque has the highest concentration of Indigenous people in New Mexico.

indigenous womanIn the past two months, eight cities got rid of Columbus Day in favor of adopting Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Three of those cities adopted Indigenous Peoples’ Day this week.

Here are the names of those 8 cities:

Albuquerque (New Mexico), Lawrence (KS), Portland (OR), St. Paul (MN), Bexar County (TX), Anadarko (OK), Olympia (WA), Alpena (MI).

These cities are following in the footsteps of Seattle and Minneapolis.

Meanwhile, Oklahoma City came close to passing it in September and will try to pass it again on October 13th, the day after the holiday.

Indigenous-Peoples-Day-bannerThis name change is a fantastic trend that needs to grow fast, but it needs to be followed up by concrete action and legislation. Nationwide (and worldwide – particularly in Latin American countries that have suffered from US-backed coups), indigenous people suffer from economic inequality, health problems, and human rights abuses. It’s time we celebrate their culture and tradition rather than their oppressors’, and it’s time we give back to those we’ve taken so much from.

From Dylan Sevett, US-Uncut.