Some American cities abolish Columbus Day

indigenous day instead of columbusFollowing a growing trend, the city council of Albuquerque, New Mexico has voted six to three to recognize October 12th – typically known to most as “Columbus Day” within the USA– as Indigenous Peoples’ day in a new proclamation. Albuquerque has the highest concentration of Indigenous people in New Mexico.

indigenous womanIn the past two months, eight cities got rid of Columbus Day in favor of adopting Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Three of those cities adopted Indigenous Peoples’ Day this week.

Here are the names of those 8 cities:

Albuquerque (New Mexico), Lawrence (KS), Portland (OR), St. Paul (MN), Bexar County (TX), Anadarko (OK), Olympia (WA), Alpena (MI).

These cities are following in the footsteps of Seattle and Minneapolis.

Meanwhile, Oklahoma City came close to passing it in September and will try to pass it again on October 13th, the day after the holiday.

Indigenous-Peoples-Day-bannerThis name change is a fantastic trend that needs to grow fast, but it needs to be followed up by concrete action and legislation. Nationwide (and worldwide – particularly in Latin American countries that have suffered from US-backed coups), indigenous people suffer from economic inequality, health problems, and human rights abuses. It’s time we celebrate their culture and tradition rather than their oppressors’, and it’s time we give back to those we’ve taken so much from.

From Dylan Sevett, US-Uncut.

Kentucky fried potatoes recipe

Here are the secret ingredients for the spice mix:

 

  • 75 g plain flour
  • 2 tsp (teaspoon) salt
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1 tsp basil
  • 1 tsp sage
  • 1 tsp marjoram
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp garlic powder

▶ Awesome Kentucky Fried Potatoes Recipe – Titli’s Busy Kitchen – YouTube.

Why Baltimore is so angry

Baltimore is the biggest city close to our correspondants’ school in Towson.

Some parts of Baltimore are rich, some are a great tourist destination, but some parts of the city are poor and know many social problems. This explains part of some citizens’ reactions after Freddie Gray’s death under police custody last week.

▶ Why Baltimore Is So Angry – YouTube.

Protests in New York over Freddie Gray’s death in Baltimore

Freddy Gray, a young African American from Baltimore, died last week from serious injuries that he got while being transported in a police van.

There have been protest marches in Baltimore, some turning violent as rioters broke shop windows, attacked the police and burnt cars. Other members of the Baltimore community have called for peace.

Marches have now been led in memory of Freddie Gray, demanding justice, in other American cities.

▶ Protests in New York over Freddie Gray’s death in Baltimore – YouTube.

New York survivor

Here is how this New Yorker describes his life:

“After I was born, I was the subject of a 45-minute dissertation at Columbia University. Almost all of my organs were born externally, and had to be sewn into my body. I don’t have a belly button– only a scar where my feeding tube used to be. My mother even tells me that she wasn’t sure if I’d ever be able to stand, eat, or drink. But now I can rollerblade. I can do a handstand on my crutches. I’ve got a core group of friends, a girlfriend, a college degree, and I’m helping to manage a radio station at the age of 23.”

Humans New York handicap

Read more about ordinary and extraordinary New Yorkers at www.humansofnewyork.com/

50th anniversary of historic civil rights march

50 years ago, brave people marched across a bridge to demand equal rights for Black people in the USA. This weekend we honor their action gratefully. See President Obama speak in Selma, Alabama.

▶ Selma to mark 50th anniversary of historic civil rights march, ‘Bloody Sunday’ – YouTube.

Yusor Abu-Salha, crime victim, expressed herself on being an American

▶ Yusor Abu-Salha Blessed To Be American – YouTube.

This young girl, her husband and her sister were killed recently by a neighbor. The inquest is not over so we don’t know yet if this was a hate crime against Muslims or a neighborhood killing. Either way, their deaths are a sad blow to the community of Chappel Hill they belonged to.

Yusor Abu-Salha had spoken in an interview of what being an American women felt like for her. Here are extracts of this interview:

Pittsburg police chief takes stand against racism

Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay set off a battle with police unions when he posed with a sign that reads, ‘I resolve to challenge racism @ work #EndWhiteSilence.’ Some think this means policemen are racists. McLay says the sign is not against anyone, and that he was just showing support to anti-racism campaigners. After several black men were shot by police in 2014, McLay wants to show that no racism will be accepted within the police force.

cop chief stop racism

“I Can’t Breathe” congressman’s tribute to Eric Garner

Wednesday night, a grand jury in New York City refused to indict police officers in the killing of Eric Garner, a man who died after officers used an illegal chokehold on him. The decision set off protests across the country.Some in Congress have already expressed their solidarity with Garner.

Hank Johnson, the sponsor of legislation to curb police militarization, made a moving tribute to Garner, including the phrase, “I can’t breathe” between each statement—the phrase  Eric Garner said as he was being strangled, and which has since become a rallying cry for protesters.

Muslim prayer in American national cathedral

Muslim prayer in American cathedral

The Washington National Cathedral, considered the United States’ “national prayer house,” hosted a Muslim service Friday, the first such event in the sanctuary’s history.

Muslim prayer rugs were laid and “the Arabic call to prayer echoed among the vaulted stone arches,” which the dean of the cathedral, the Very Rev. Gary Hall, called “a beautiful sacred language in a beautiful sacred space,” according to The Washington Post.

Welcoming the worshipers, director of liturgy Rev. Canon Gina Gilland Campbell said, “Salaam, shalom, peace. You are all so very welcome here.” She also used the occasion to issue an impassioned call for interfaith understanding, saying, “Let us stretch our hearts and let us seek to deepen mercy for we worship the same God.”

Christian and Muslim leaders also spoke about the need for religious dialogue and harmony, including South Africa’s Muslim Ambassador to the U.S. Ebhraim Rasool, co-organizer of the event. Rasool used the sermon, or Khutba, to call for the protection of Christians in the Middle East, as well as greater Muslim tolerance for other religions, saying: “I think that we must return to the Muslim prophetic tradition in which the Prophet, may peace be upon him, invited Christians to his own mosque that he established in Medina – and said to them, you can pray here.”

Islam is the third-largest religion in the United States, behind Christianity and Judaism, and with at least 2.6 million adherents, constitutes approximately 0.8% of the country’s population.